CNBC SCAM WARNING ABOUT WORKING FROM HOME! (No, it’s not CNBC. It’s a poser.)

A few days ago, I have been worrying about all of my finances and worrying about getting enough money to move when I thought I had been given a godsend by CNBC. A few people that I follow on Twitter posted a link to this site, a site called http://www.cnbc.com-article.it/u/?t=27852 (DO NOT GO TO THE SITE UNLESS YOU WANT TO READ LIES).

Here is the screenshot of the page you get.

Unfortunately, what it doesn’t mention is the fact that the site is not owned by CNBC. The end of the link is .it, not .com (due to the tricky hyphenation after the “cnbc.com” ).

When I first clicked on the link, I was in Suffield and it told me the woman was from Suffield. It got me to enter my email address then immediately told me that I was lucky because there were two opportunities left there. I was looking on my phone so I figured I’d email the link to myself and check it later.

I am currently enjoying a late lunch in Windsor Locks and decided to click on the link again. It then reminded me that there were two opportunities in Windsor Locks (without me entering my location).

I looked back at the “news article” and realized that there was NO link to this “Patty’s Blog” on the page. My spidey sense went a-tingling, so I ended up going to CNBC.com itself and look up the information. I did a broad search with the title on the page and there was nothing. I also searched for the author. Whoever created this faux article pulled the name of a blogger for CNBC to give it credibility, but when you search under the blogger’s name on the CNBC site, it’s not there.

Understand that people will occasionally try to slight you on the internet. This person wanted me to spend $200 for insight on how to make a ridiculous amount of money working from home. It’s a very very tantalizing thing. However, when I decided to wait, the website started harrassing me saying they would “discount the offer to $47.95” and then when I selected to leave the page it gave me this mess of spam.

I know that this time of year, people tend to think that there is a miracle solution to save their financial windfall that they’re entering the year with. I just wanted to let you know that the article that has been spreading like wildfire is not from CNBC.

Be safe everybody!

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